Early Hospitals

Old Presyterian Hospital Charlotte, North Carolina
 
On October 7, 1903, local physicians meet at the courthouse in Charlotte and organize the Mecklenburg County Medical Society. Dr. H. Q. Alexander is the first president; Dr. Annie Alexander becomes the vice-president and Dr. Parks M. King is the first secretary-treasurer. Forty-one men and one woman are the charter members of this society. By 1910, Charlotte has a number of hospitals and health clinics, including St. Peter’s Hospital (1876), Good Samaritan Hospital (1891), Presbyterian Hospital (1903), Mercy Hospital (1906), and The Charlotte Sanatorium (1907).
On October 7, 1903, local physicians meet at the courthouse in Charlotte and organize the Mecklenburg County Medical Society. Dr. H. Q. Alexander is the first president; Dr. Annie Alexander becomes the vice-president and Dr. Parks M. King is the first secretary-treasurer. Forty-one men and one woman are the charter members of this society.
By 1910, Charlotte has a number of hospitals and health clinics, including St. Peter’s Hospital (1876), Good Samaritan Hospital (1891), Presbyterian Hospital (1903), Mercy Hospital (1906), and The Charlotte Sanatorium (1907).
Diseases such as cholera, typhoid fever, scarlet fever, mumps, tetanus, polio and tuberculosis are prevalent at the beginning of the twentieth century. There are no antibiotics like penicillin. Many children die from common illnesses, such as a cold, the measles, flu or chicken pox. If a broken bone is not set properly, the child is crippled for life. Sometimes infection sets in and the limb is amputated in order to save the life. Doctors visit their patients at home, if they are too sick to come to the office.